History of marysville california

The information on this page comes from the book "Images of America Marysville" By: Tammy L. Hopkins and Henry Delamere. This is only some of the information from this book, if you are interested in buying this book and viewing many more pictures and learning more about Marysville, you can click this link and purchase the book.

 

THEODOR CORDUA (1796-1857).   A Prussian immigrant, Cordua came to Yuba County and established a business located at the junction of two mighty rivers, the Yuba and the Feather, on land leased to him by Capt. John A Sutter.  He named the area after his homeland of New Mecklenburg, but the neighbors referred to it as Cordua’s Ranch.  The first buildings were made from adobe brick and used for trading, buying and receiving merchandise, and as an embarking place for passengers.  The junction was known as “The Plaza.”

 


 

MERIAM MARJORY “MARY MURPHY” COVILLAUD (1831-1867).   As a Donner Party survivor and first white female in the new town, she became its namesake.  She married town founder Charles Covillaud on Christmas Day in 1853, and they had five children.  Mary died at age 36 and is buried in the Catholic section of St. Joseph’s Church Cemetery.

CHARLES JULIAN COVILLAUD SR.  (1816-1867).  Charles was born in Cognac, France, and came to the United States in 1841.  He came overland to California via St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1846 and went to work for Theodor Cordua as a cooper who made pork barrels. Because of his success in the gold mines, Covillaud purchased half of Cordua’s ownership and property in the town.  He died at age 51 and is buried in the Masonic section of Marysville City Cemetery.

 


 

STEPHEN JOHNSON FIELD (1819-1899).  Field arrived in San Francisco, CA in December 1849, with $2 and a stack of newspapers, which he sold for $1 each.  He arrived in Marysville in January 1850, and with only $10, signed up to purchase 65 lots in the new town at a cost of $16,250.  Charles Covillaud hired Field as his attorney to write land grant deeds.  After only three days residency, he was elected alcalde (judge, jury and prosecutor of the law under Mexican rule); he was later elected to the assembly and became a prominent lawmaker for the state of California.  President Abraham Lincoln appointed Field to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1863.  He was the first California to be appointed a justice of the Supreme Court and served for over 40 years.  He is buried with his wife, Sue Virginia Swearingen, in Washington, D.C.  His home still stands at 630 D Street in Marysville and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

 


 

NORMAN DUNNING RIDEOUT (1832-1907) and PHEBE MASON (ABBOTT) RIDEOUT (1841-1932).  Norman Rideout was the founder of the Rideout Bank (now Bank of America) in the St. Nicholas Building located at the southeast corner of Third and D Streets.  He developed the first chain of banks in California, linking the branches by telephone.  He and Phebe were married in Oct. 1858, and had three children.  Norman Rideout served as mayor, supervisor and councilman of Marysville during his political career.

 


 

RIDEOUT HOUSE (425 Fifth Street).   John Paxton built Rideout House on the southeast corner of Fifth and E Streets in May 1862 for $8,000.  It became the home of Norman and Phebe Rideout.  After Norman died, the house was converted into a hospital in his memory, and Phebe Rideout donated the land and home to help complete the project.  The home was converted and opened to the public May 1, 1908.  The hospital needed additional space, and in 1926, the house was demolished and a new facility built on H Street between Third and Fourth.  Hotel Marysville was built in 1927 on the lot at Fifth and E Streets.

 


 

FRANCIS WILLIAM HOWARD AARON (1829-1897), MARY MUSGROVE BOBO (1850-1930s), and CHARLES FRANCIS AARON (1875-1953).  “Frank” Aaron arrived in California from Wales in December 1849.  This prominent businessman founded and owned Marysville Water Company.  He was also the bookkeeper for Marysville Gas and Electric, and a trustee for Marysville Library Association.  Frank and his son, Charles, founded the Northern California Savings and Loan.   Frank wed Mary Bobo, the daughter of physician Charles Bobo, in September 1974.  Mary belonged to many societies and clubs in town, and was a prominent lady and pioneer of Marysville.  Charles was a well-respected real estate and insurance entrepreneur.

 


 

MILLER/AARON HOUSE (704 D Street).  Architect Warren Miller designed and built this two-story home in 1851 at a cost of $5,000.  The Aaron family bought the home in January 1875.  Their son Charles deeded the home to the City of Marysville, turning it into a museum honoring his mother, Mary.  The house is one of Marysville’s oldest and finest brick structures.  One of the fountains from Cortez Square (site of the 1858 California State Fair) is in the yard, and two of its front windows are from the Yuba County Courthouse once located at Sixth and D Street.  Mary and Charles are standing in the front yard.

 


 

WILLIAM TURNER ELLIS, JR. (1866-1955).  Ellis was the founder and “father” of the Marysville levee system.  He married Lola Walton and they had two daughters.  In 1899, he joined the family wholesale grocery business.  His political career began in 1894.  He was elected levee commissioner in 1900, appointed to the California State Board of Reclamation in 1913, elected to the Yuba County Board of Supervisors in 1925, and was the youngest mayor at age 28, serving two terms.  He died never seeing his levees protect the city of Marysville during the floods of 1955.

 


 

THE CASTLE (222-225 Fifth Street).  The Castle was built by Jose Manuel Ramirez (one of Marysville’s founding fathers) in 1851.  He used bricks and sand for the foundation, 30-inch adobe bricks for walls, and
13-foot ceilings at a cost of over $30,000.  The area’s first banker, Mark Brumagim, occupied the home after Ramirez left Marysville.  The staircases were located outside of the home in case of a Native American attack.  This beautiful mansion is one of Marysville’s oldest homes and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

 


 

JOHN HOWARD JEWETT and PETER D. DECKER (1822-1888).  John Jewett (left) was a cofounder of Decker-Jewett Bank.  He came to the area with partner Horace Beach; they canoed across the Feather River to join the business district of Marysville with their belongings strapped to the backs of mules who swam beside their canoe.  Jewett was elected mayor of Marysville in 1852 and city councilman in 1859.  He married Mary Bartes and they had a son named Stephen Boyd Jewett.  Founder of Decker and Company, Peter Decker (right) joined with John Jewett, John Paxton and Frederick Low to purchase Cunningham and Brumagim, Marysville, first bank.  Decker and Jewett later bought out their partners and renamed the business the Decker-Jewettt Bank.  Decker was the elected mayor of Marysville in 1853.  He died in 1888.

 


 

DECKER-JEWETT BANK (60 D Street, 212 D Street, and 321 D Street).  Bank cofounders and lifelong partners, John Jewett and Peter Decker had one of the few banks that survived the Depression of the 1920s and l930s.  During a robbery attempt, Jewett and cashier Atkins Bingham foiled the crime by shooting the bandit with guns hidden under the bank counters.  Being the oldest out of 447 banks in California, it closed in 1934.  The building was demolished in 1977.  An 1853 Marysville city directory states both Decker and Jewett lived upstairs from the bank.

 


 

EDWIN ALEXANDER FORBES (1860-1915).  Brig. Gen. Edwin “E.A.” Forbes served as the adjutant general for the state of California and was the founder of California Cadet Corps and the California National Guard.  A third-grade teacher by the age of 18, Forbes also served as city attorney (1884) and district attorney (1885), forming a law partnership with Wallace Dinsmore in Marysville that lasted more than 25 years.  He bought the Marysville Appeal newspaper in 1905.

 


 

THE FORBES HOUSE (618 D Street).  Built in 1854 at a cost of $6,000, the Forbes House was home to Brig. Gen. Edwin Alexander Forbes and his wife, Elizabeth Jane Yore.  The Italianate Revival home is still standing with its beautiful staircase, fireplace, and courtyard.  It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 


 

THE BELCHER FAMILY (78 D Street).  Isaac Sawyer Belcher started the law firm Belcher and Belcher; his brothers, Edward Augustus (not pictured) and William Caldwell, also lawyers, became partners in the prominent company.  Each brother once served as city attorney of Marysville.  They were well known for their involvement in the anti-debris lawsuit to stop hydraulic mining on the Yuba River.  Isaac’s son, Richard. Belcher, joined the firm and became a prominent member of society.  He is the only member of the Elks Lodge to serve as exalted ruler for two consecutive terms; and as a sports fan, formed the Trolley Baseball League (the Marysville Giants won the league championship in 1934).  Isaac was grand master of the California Masons several times.

 


 

THE ISAAC BELCHER HOUSE (529 C Street).  The magnificent residence of Isaac Sawyer Belcher was built in 1870 and demolished in October 1938 to make room for city hall.  The architect and builder were Swain and Hudson of Marysville.

 


 

WESTERN HOTEL (201-215 d Street).  Opened on November 1, 1853, the five-star Western Hotel was built for $30,000 by R. J. Murray.  It burned in May 1854, June 1933, and August 1956.  The hotel had installed the first elevator, steam heaters, and electricity between Sacramento and Portland in 1911; thus, it kept the hotel ranked with its five-star rating.  The hotel stood for 95 years and was demolished in 1956.

 


 

UNITED STATES HOTEL (302-308 C Street).  The United States Hotel was built in 1856 by Lee and Hoffman; the proprietors were L. Scheu and W. Swank.  The original United States Hotel, a tent, was located at D Street between First and Second Streets.  In 1867, while campaigning, Ulysses S. Grant stayed at the hotel.  The hotel, with 52 rooms, was demolished in 1971, making way for a library to honor John Q. Packard.

 


 

HOTEL MARYSVILLE (420-426 Fifth Street).  The Hotel Marysville was located on the southeast corner of Fifth and E Streets.  Built in 1926-1927 by Rossi and Nelson for $400,000, the original hotel was located at First and C Streets and owned by George Engler, the son-in-law of Capt. John A. Sutter.  The property was deeded to the city and was the site of the original Rideout Hospital founded by Phebe Abbott Rideout.

 


 

GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL (228 C Street).  Golden Eagle Hotel was located on the southwest corner of Second and C Streets.  Built in 1862 with 40 rooms, it was Marysville’s first three-story hotel.  The proprietor was Alfred Farnham.   It was remodeled in 1895; the building was demolished in the 1970s.

 


 

INSIDE THE GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL AND BAR.  This 1856 photograph shows the interior of the Golden Eagle Hotel and Bar with its beautiful birds and wood-accented décor.

 


 

 

 


 

FARMING IN YUBA COUNTY.  Shown here is one of first horse-drawn threshing harvesters and grain wagons in the county.  The men seen in this July 1888 photograph are workers of the Royden and Pharris Farming Company.

 


 

THE J.B. BARRIE RANCH.  With his 32 horse-and-mule teams, John Barrie, who started farming at the age of 15 for his uncle J. F. Barrie, is seen here reaping his farm during the harvest of 1902.  The Barrie family are pioneers of Yuba County.  These pioneer farmers arrived and started farming this area in 1855.  John married Mary O’Donald and they had nine children.

 


 

BEST TRACTOR.  Daniel Best and the Holt brothers of Stockton invented a prototype engine and design for a tractor that helped influence the agricultural industry; it later became the Caterpillar bulldozer tractor.  The Best tractor was built on Henry Best’s ranch in Marysville (Henry was Daniel’s uncle).

 


 

YUBA BALL TRACTOR.  The Yuba ball tractor, developed and designed by Warren P. Miller, had tracks instead of wheels as its drive train.  This state-of-the-art machine replaced the rear wheels of the tractor with tracks to keep them from sinking in the wet ground.  This prototype was the starting point of a new farming era.

 


 

W. R. SKINNER FRUIT PACKING.  Once located on A Street, this packing shed had the most unique air circulation system.  The fans were activated by ropes under the table, and by someone stepping on the ropes, the fans moved back and forth.  This fruit-packing plant was part of the California Fruit Packing Association.

 


 

BUCKEYE FLOUR MILL (3-9 Yuba Street).  Built in July 1853, the Buckeye Flour Mill was the largest four-producing plant in California during the 19th century.  This mill survived floods in Marysville when the other mills failed, but it was devastated by a fire.

 


 

UNION LUMBER (401 B Street).  Established in 1852 by W. K. Hudson and Samuel Harryman as Hudson and Company, this lumber business was originally located on the northwest corner of C and Fourth Streets.  It became Union Lumber and incorporated in 1864.  Bookkeeper H. J. Cheim purchased the business.  Union Lumber is located at Fourth and B Street and is still owned by the Cheim family.

 


 

PEFFER PLANING MILL.  When mining started to die down, lumber became the industry of choice.  Established in 1871, Peffer Planing Mill, owned by John and Gottlieb Peffer, was one of the largest planning mills in Marysville.  It was located on the east side of C Street between Fourth and Fifth Streets.

 


 

MARYSVILLE ELECTRIC WORKS.  Founded in 1851 by David E. Knight, the electric company was located on Fourth Street between B Street and California Alley.  Marysville Gas & Electric later became part of Pacific Gas and Electric, and it was located at the southwest corner of Sixth and E Streets.  Yuba County is home to three hydroelectric dams and plants.

 


 

MARYSVILLE GAS AND COAL COMPANY.  The illuminating gas and coal processing plant was founded by David Edgar Knight.  Located at Second Street between B and C Streets, Marysville Gas & Coal became Marysville Gas & Electric in 1899, just prior to Knight’s death.  It later merged with Marysville Electric Works.  David Knight married Mary Suber; the family crypt is in Marysville City Cemetery.

 


 

MARYSVILLE WATER COMPANY (329-331 Fourth Street).  Francis W. H. Aaron hired an architect by the name of Patton, and builder Swain and Hudson, to construct a water building and reservoir for the residents of Marysville.  A fire forced remodeling in 1888, and a larger water tank was added in June 1911.  The building , located on the southeast corner of Fourth and D Streets, is listed in the National Register of Historical Places.

 


 

FIRST PEACH TRUCK.  This truck was the very first vehicle to haul peaches from the orchard to market in 1914.  This was the start of “orchard automation” and trucking in Marysville.  Along with Sutter County, the area is known as the Peach Bowl Capital of the World.

 


 

THE SCHMIPF DAIRY.  The Schmipf Dairy, owned by Jacob and Mary Schmipf and located in east Marysville, was so popular that the area was nicknamed Schmipfville.  Pictured here is milkman Mueller Gottlieb.  Two dairy employees were once involved in an argument over a woman; one of the men murdered with other with a hammer.

 


 

J. R. GARRETT AND COMPANY (412-414 Third Street).  Third Street, between High and D Streets, was home to J. R. Garrett Wholesale Grocers, the largest and longest-running wholesale grocer in California.  James Riley Garrett started the business in 1885; the building was demolished in 1977.

 


 

JOHN O. CUNNINGHAM (323 D Street).  J. O. Cunningham, merchant tailor, was located on the east side of D Street between Third and Fourth Streets.  The 300 block of D Street is one of the oldest areas in the business district.  After Cunningham closed his store, Joseph and Mary Brass purchased it, making 323 D Street their home and business – Joseph Brass Cigars.

 


 

MAUCH SHOE REPAIR (316 First Street).  Mauch Shoe Repair was located in the Chinatown district of Marysville.  According to record, Mauch, known for his craftsmanship, once patched a pair of shoes for a customer that lasted 25 years.

 


 

YUBA MARKET (Fourteenth and B Streets).  The size of the crowd at the new Yuba Market grand opening was a surprise to owner Leland Lee, who was concerned about how many people were waiting to get in.  The original Yuba Market was owned by Shew Lee at 520 Third Street in Marysville.

 


 

THE DELUXE BARBER SHOP (425 Fourth Street).  Owner Floyd “Fud” Burtis gave many local boys their first haircuts.

 


 

METCALF’S EAT AND RUN.  Metcalf’s Eat and Run Donut Shop, located on the southwest corner of Tenth and F Streets in Marysville, was owned by Herb Metcalf.  After Herb retired, the shop closed and a Walgreen’s Drug Store opened at the location.

 


 

MARYSVILLE-YUBA CITY DAIRY (827 E Street).  Marysville-Yuba City Dairy was located on the southeast corner of Ninth and E Streets in Marysville.  Owner Stanley “Bud” Watson was once fined $500 for watering down the milk.  This picture was taken in 1913, shortly after the dairy opened.

 


 

THE CALIFORNIA MARKET (Third and E Streets).  The California Market was next to the Masonic Lodge at Third and E Streets.  Joesph Del Pero started this family business in 1906 when, heeding a warning from his doctor that he needed a drier climate, he moved his wife and sons to Marysville.  The business pioneered portion control and freeze drying techniques.  Some of the family is pictured here outside their shop.

 


 

DEL PERO-MONDON MEAT COMPANY (1104 Chestnut Street).  A malfunction in the sausage machine inside the Del Peros’ California Market started a fire and destroyed the market and Masonic Lodge.  Re-opened by the Del Pero’s and partner Gus Mondon, it remained a prosperous family business until the 1980s.

 


 

BRUNSWICK BILLIARDS AND CLUB RENDEZVOUS (218-220 D Street).  Brunswick Billiards was one of Marysville’s most popular hangouts with local residents.  In the early days, patrons filled the barber chairs and shopped for fine tobacco.  In the later years, the club owners were Marysville Giants ballplayers and twins Jim and John Goodman.  Club-Rendezvous next-door was also a popular hangout for patrons.

 


 

 

 


 

ERNIE’S TOYLAND (418 Fourth Street).  Owner Ernie Coopman made this store into every child’s delight.  Both Coopman Jr. and Sr. truly knew the toy business, making Ernie’s Toyland Marysville’s finest and largest toy store; it stocked everything from babyland to bicycles on the second floor.  The store later moved to Yuba City before finally closing in the 1980s.

 


 

STAR ICE CREAM AND BUTTER (905 B Street).  Located at Ninth and California Alley, the business was owned by Manny Gomes, Mickey Sullivan, and Herman Berg.  This building originally housed Marysville Brewing Company, with Michael Reisinger as proprietor, which survived a fire in 1912 only to be converted to Star Ice Cream and Butter during Prohibition.  It is now the location of the Marysville Fire Department.

 


 

MARYSVILLE CREAMERY.  Marysville Creamery, located at the southwest corner of Second and E Streets, was built in 1860 and demolished in 1977.  Marysville Creamery and Star Ice Cream and Butter Company merged in 1925.

 


 

PUTMAN’S (501 D Street).  Owners Louis Putman and Anita Steele purchased Bud and Roy’s service station and converted the building into a successful housewares shop.  Their father first opened Putman’s as an appliance shop on Third Street.

 


 

JAY’S (520 D Street).  Jay’s Department Store had its grand opening after owners Woodrow and Dorothy Jang consolidated their many different stores on D Street into one large store to make shopping easier on their customers.  Jay’s was one of Marysville’s most successful stores, and this photograph shows off some of the customers waiting to see the new location.

 


 

KELLY BROTHERS STABLES  (314 E Street) – and 1915 FIRE.  The Kelly brothers had some of the finest stables in town.  They not only owned stables – Kelly Brothers Undertaking Parlor was located on D Street between First and Second Streets on the first floor of the Elk’s Lodge.  John K. Kelly was the city’s first coroner – note the horse-drawn hearses.  Kelly Brothers Stables burned in 1915.

 


 

 

 


 

THE SUEY SING BUILDING (305 First Street).  Suey Sing is one of three tong societies in Marysville’s Chinatown.  The building burned in 1936 and was remodeled in 1937.  Located on the northern corner of First and C Streets, the Suey Sing is one of California’s oldest societies still practicing.

 


 

HOP SING SOCIETY BUILDING (110 ½  C Street).  Another of Marysville’s Chinatown ton societies, the Hop Sing is also one of the oldest societies still practicing today.  Both Suey and Hop Sing are vital to Chinatown and take part in the Bok Kai Festival each year.

 


 

BOOT AND SHOES (Second & D Streets).  Cobbler shops were a dime a dozen in Marysville, but each of them had something unique to offer.  The craftsmanship of this cobbler shop was well known.  Note the fire department’s horse-drawn hose reel in the foreground.

 


 

MARYSVILLE STEAM LAUNDRY (215 E Street).  C. B. “Albert” (by the wagon) and E. P. “Peter” Andross were in charge of the deliveries for this laundry, which later became part of Bossen Laundry and moved to its new home on B Street.  Bossen Laundry recently closed its doors after more than 30 years of service.

 


 

ANITA’S, KIRBY’S, AND FEDERAL.  Located at the southeast corner of Fifth and D Streets, this small strip of buildings was the start of a new look and era for this part of Marysville.

 


 

RUBEL’S DRUG STORE (320 D Street).  One of Marysville’s oldest drugstores, Rubel’s supplied residents with just about anything they needed.  It occupied an 1860s building.

 


 

INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS (301-303 D Street).  This landmark building was one of many in town designed by architect Warren P. Miller.

 


 

MASONIC LODGE (427a E Street).  Built in 1856, this lodge was the first of its kind in California.  It burned down when the sausage machine at the California Market next-door malfunctioned and started a fire.  It was the home of Corinthian Lodge No. 9 F&AM.

 


 

MARYSVILLE INDEPENDENT BANDS.  Pictured above on D Street in Marysville on June 18, 1888, the Marysville Independent Brass Band practices at Old Turner Hall, 824 E Street.  It was one of the few city bands to last up until World War II.  Below, the band is pictured at Second and D Streets, c.1878.  Marysville had a long tradition of independent city bands playing summer concerts in Cortez Square and participating in parades and other community events.

 


 

MARYSVILLE INDEPENDENT BANDS.  Pictured above on D Street in Marysville on June 18, 1888, the Marysville Independent Brass Band practices at Old Turner Hall, 824 E Street.  It was one of the few city bands to last up until World War II.  Below, the band is pictured at Second and D Streets, c.1878.  Marysville had a long tradition of independent city bands playing summer concerts in Cortez Square and participating in parades and other community events.

 


 

MARYSVILLE GRAMMAR SCHOOL (713 F Street).   Built in 1913 and one of at least five buildings in Marysville designed by renowned California architect Julia Morgan ((Hearst Castle architect).  The school was torn down after World War II and a larger school was built in its place.

 


 

MARYSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL (1919 B Street)  This Marysville High School was built in 1927, becoming the third school to house Marysville High Students.  Founded the same year, within this same structure, the Yuba Community College became one of the first community colleges in America to serve a rural area.  Under the guidance of Curtis Warren and Pedro Osuna, the college was given an award by the Carnegie Institute for progressivism in continuing education.  Yuba Community College District, and Yuba College itself, continue to serve the community today.

 


 

ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH AND INTERIOR (701 C Street).  In September 1852, Father Peter Magagnotto used his own money to build a 32 x 43-foot wooden church on the northeast corner of Seventh & C Streets.  It served as a place of worship for two years while Father Magagnotto built an elegant new church with a 100-foot Gothic spire designed by Warren P. Miller.  The cornerstone was laid in September 1855 by Archbishop J. S. Alemany.

 


 

ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH AND INTERIOR (701 C Street).  In September 1852, Father Peter Magagnotto used his own money to build a 32 x 43-foot wooden church on the northeast corner of Seventh & C Streets.  It served as a place of worship for two years while Father Magagnotto built an elegant new church with a 100-foot Gothic spire designed by Warren P. Miller.  The cornerstone was laid in September 1855 by Archbishop J. S. Alemany.

 


 

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (427 Fifth Street).  The first church was a small wooden building erected in 1851 at a cost of nearly $5,000, with Jose M. Ramirez making the first donation of $100.  Although the building burned, its $650 bell survived the fire.  In 1959, a new church was built on the northeast corner of Fifth and D Streets.  Designed by architect Warren P. Miller, the $33,000 church was torn down in the 1950s.

 


 

 

 


 

STATE THEATRE (515 E Street).  Originally established as the National Theater, this structure was built in 1927 by T & D Enterprises, who built several other theaters in the area.  Still standing today, the theater at one time housed a massive pipe organ.  The photograph can be dated to 1954 when the movie on the marquee, Drum Beat, with Alan Ladd, was playing.

 


 

MARYSVILLE WATER COMPANY (329-331 Fourth Street).  Francis W. H. Aaron hired an architect by the name of Patton, and builder Swain and Hudson, to construct a water building and reservoir for the residents of Marysville.  A fire forced remodeling in 1888, and a larger water tank was added in June 1911.  The building , located on the southeast corner of Fourth and D Streets, is listed in the National Register of Historical Places.

 


 

PARADES.  Indicative of Marysville’s community spirit and notoriety as a town that knows how to have a good time, parades of all kinds are commonplace throughout its history.  Another special part of Marysville’s history can be seen in the background of the above photograph, which features on the far right side of the image the Bank of America building, one of several in town designed by Julia Morgan.  Morgan was a close friend of Norman D. and Phebe Rideout, founders and proprietors of the first chain of banks in California.  Morgan designed this structure for Rideout as a part of the Rideout Bank chain.  In the 1920s, Phebe, then a widower, sold the chain to Bank of Italy, an extremely successful bank begun in San Francisco by Amadeo Giannini, which went on to become the Bank of America.

 


 

PARADES.  Indicative of Marysville’s community spirit and notoriety as a town that knows how to have a good time, parades of all kinds are commonplace throughout its history.  Another special part of Marysville’s history can be seen in the background of the above photograph, which features on the far right side of the image the Bank of America building, one of several in town designed by Julia Morgan.  Morgan was a close friend of Norman D. and Phebe Rideout, founders and proprietors of the first chain of banks in California.  Morgan designed this structure for Rideout as a part of the Rideout Bank chain.  In the 1920s, Phebe, then a widower, sold the chain to Bank of Italy, an extremely successful bank begun in San Francisco by Amadeo Giannini, which went on to become the Bank of America.

 


 

ELLIS LAKE.  Marysville’s Ellis Lake was originally a natural waterway or slough between the Yuba and Feather Rivers.  It is named after prominent Marysville resident William T. Ellis, Jr.

 


 

ICE-SKATING JUST NORTH OF THE W.T. ELLIS SR. HOME.  Though Ellis Lake rarely freezes, this particularly cold February in 1888 finds W.T. Ellis, Jr., third from left, ice skating with other Marysville residents.  Ellis, Jr. sold the lake to the city of Marysville for $1, but the check was never cashed.

 


 

EVACUATION OF MARYSVILLE.  In December 1955 at First & E Streets, the city is being evacuated.  Families piled themselves and their belongings into cars and drove to higher ground to escape possible floodwaters.

 


 

SANDBAGGING.  The above photograph shows one of many locations in Yuba City were people organized sandbagging teams to stop the rising floodwaters.  On Christmas Eve 1955, the Shanghai Bend Levee broke, and Yuba City was inundated by floodwaters.  Below, residents from Marysville and Yuba City, and soldiers from Beale Air Force Base, are working around the clock to sandbag the levee at the D Street Bridge in Marysville during the 1955 flood.

 


 

SANDBAGGING.  The above photograph shows one of many locations in Yuba City were people organized sandbagging teams to stop the rising floodwaters.  On Christmas Eve 1955, the Shanghai Bend Levee broke, and Yuba City was inundated by floodwaters.  Below, residents from Marysville and Yuba City, and soldiers from Beale Air Force Base, are working around the clock to sandbag the levee at the D Street Bridge in Marysville during the 1955 flood.

 


 

MARYSVILLE’S D STREET.  Although the exact date is uncertain, records indicate that sometime in the 1850s, Marysville received over 1.75 inches of rain in less than 15 minutes.

 


 

TOWN FIRE, 1851.  This lithograph shows the bucket brigade that assisted in quelling the worst fire ever to hit Marysville.  The entire city nearly burned to the ground, and the cost of damages was over one-half million dollars.

 


 

MARYSVILLE FIRE DEPARTMENT (302 Third Street).  William Reilly, who at one time served as captain, poses in front of the firehouse with the rest of the crew.   In 1959, the department moved to its new location at Ninth & A Streets, the former location of Star Ice Cream and Butter Company.  In the photograph below, a horse-drawn fire wagon is racing up D Street to a fire on Seventh Street between C & D Streets.

 


 

 

 


 

THE FIRST MAIL CARRIERS.  Marysville mail carriers began delivering mail to the area on July 28, 1850.  Marysville mailboxes were in 14 locations throughout town.

 


 

MARYSVILLE POST OFFICE (407 C Street).  The Works Project Administration building was constructed between 1934 and 1939, and remodeled in 1967.  It was once the third largest post office in Northern California.  The first postmaster was James Cushing, and the first post office in town was located inside of Cushing’s real estate office on Second Street and Maiden Lane.  Marysville Post Office was also the location of California’s first woman postmaster, Emma Hapgood.

 


 

 

 


 

MARYSVILLE CITY HALL AND MARYSVILLE FIRE DEPARTMENT (Third & C Streets).  The first city hall was a tent at 110 D Street, established by Stephen J. Field.  The city hall pictured above was built in December 1852 at a cost of $20,000 and used until 1939.  The fire department also used the building, until 1959, and the stables until 1917.  The county jail was added later at a price tag of $8,000, and jail cells cost $300 each.  Construction began on November 28, 1938, for a new, permanent city hall, built through the Works Project Administration at C Street, between Fifth and Sixth Streets, at a cost of $136,502.